September 1, 2020 9:14 pm

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SEPTEMBER IS MEXICO'S INDEPENDENCE MONTH, and although one of the most appealing things about Los Cabos is how "foreigner-friendly" it is, we know that some travelers still seek the true Mexican traditional experience. To celebrate the Mexican culture and the Country's independence from the Spanish reign, Destino Magazine has put together a list of "Real Mexican" things to do while you visit Los Cabos. You’ll probably notice that a few of them are related to food, which shouldn’t be surprising since Mexican food is a prominent part of the culture, and it’s just so good!

EAT SOME “REAL” MEXICAN FOOD

Who doesn’t love going to a taco shop stateside and enjoying a burrito, a chimichanga and even some carne asada fries? But the truth is that the common Mexican food that is familiar to you can be considered “Americanized” by Mexicans. There is nothing wrong with that, it is still delicious, but in reality there is no such thing as a taco salad or a hard shell ground beef taco in the traditional Mexican cuisine, and cumin is not used as a main ingredient in beans and salsas. You are in Cabo for the beaches and the margaritas, but don’t forget that you are in MEXICO, so we incite you to take advantage of this and try some traditional Mexican food. Many restaurants in Los Cabos have typical Mexican dishes, or we also recommend that you venture into the backstreets of town and find a hole-in-the-wall spot for some real homestyle Mexican cooking. When it comes to traditional dishes, it can't get more patriotic than a chile en nogada, a Poblano chili stuffed with picadillo – a mixture of ground pork and/or beef, apples, pears, peaches and aromatics – bathed in a sweet, creamy walnut-based sauce and then topped with pomegranates and parsley. The green parsley and chilli, the white sauce and the red pomegranates represent the colors of Mexico’s flag.

SIP A TEQUILA AND PAIR IT WITH A SANGRITA

Notice the word sip. The traditional Mexican way to drink tequila is to sip and savour it, not to shoot it. We understand if this sounds frightening, but if you order a good quality tequila it can actually be enjoyable. Ask your server for a sangrita (NOT the same as sangría), a delicious tomato juice based drink which is served in a shot glass as the perfect complement to a fine tequila. If you ask for a "bandera" (which means flag) you will get three shot glasses, each one representing the colors of the Mexican flag: one with tequila (white), one with sangrita (red) and one with lime juice (greeen).

DO A MEZCAL TASTING

Mezcal is an artisanal spirit which’s craftsmanship dates back to prehispanic times, making it as Mexican as it can get. Unlike tequila, every batch of mezcal is different, even if it comes from the same type of agave plant on the same farm. The natural elements the plant was exposed to come into play and affect the end result, producing slight changes in its flavor. There is a wide variety of types of mezcal, depending on the agave plant and the conditions it is grown in; from very earthy ones like the arroqueño, to smokier or smoother kinds. We recommend trying a flight of mezcal to experience these different flavors, several Mexican food restaurants in Los Cabos offer this. They say that mezcal is an acquired taste, so take your time to savour each one and appreciate the artful craft of mezcal.

CELEBRATE THE MEXICAN INDEPENDENCE DAY

Contrary to popular belief, May 5 (Cinco de Mayo) is not Mexico's Independence Day. The actual date of Mexico’s Independence is September 16. Independence Day is one of the most celebrated national holidays in Mexico and is commemorated with colorful parades, traditional food, lively music, marching bands, fireworks and fiestas decorated in red, white and green. Here in Los Cabos, you will find almost every bar, restaurant, and resort in town doing something festive to honor this special day including an explosive firework show on Medano Beach.

Every year on September 15, Mexico celebrates El Grito de Dolores (AKA Cry of Dolores). El Grito was the battle cry of Roman Catholic priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla in the early morning hours of September 15, 1810, in what is now the City of Dolores Hidalgo in the State of Guanajuato. Hidalgo’s cry to his townspeople to rise up against the Spanish became the cry of Independence for the whole country. Each year on this date, the President of Mexico re-enacts this famous cry from the balcony of the National Palace in Mexico City while ringing the same bell that Hidalgo rang in 1810 (which has since moved to the National Palace), shouting “Viva México! Viva la Independencia! Vivan los héroes!” Here in Los Cabos, City Officials re-enact their own version of the cry at 11pm on September 15 followed by fiestas late into the night.

This year it is uncertain how the new COVID-19 regulations will affetct the public festivities, we recommend that you consult with your concierge or with CATTAC, Los Cabos Tourist Assistance Center.

The main plazas of San José del Cabo and Cabo San Lucas are decorated in patriotic colors and ornaments during the month of September to commemorate the independence, so even if you can’t join the celebrations the day-of, you can visit the plazas to get the patriotic feel.

EAT AN ESQUITE

An esquite, also known as elote en vaso (corn in a cup) is a Mexican snack sold in street carts or food stands along with the popular Mexcian corns. The word esquite comes from the Nahuatl word ízquitl, which means "toasted corn." Esquites are made from grains of corn that are first boiled in salted water and epazote, an herb used commonly in Mexican cooking, which releases a lot of flavor when boiled. It is served hot in small cups and topped with varying combinations of lime juice, chile powder or hot sauce, salt, and mayonnaise. The fun part about it is hunting down an esquite cart! You can usually find one along the Cabo San Lucas marina (near the Plaza Bonita ramp) and in the San José del Cabo main plaza.

[page_title]

[post_date]

SEPTEMBER IS MEXICO'S INDEPENDENCE MONTH, and although one of the most appealing things about Los Cabos is how "foreigner-friendly" it is, we know that some travellers still seek the true Mexican traditional experience. To celebrate the Mexican culture and the Country's independence form the Spanish reign, Destino Magazine has put together a list of "Real Mexican" things to do while you visit Los Cabs. You’ll probably notice that a few of them are related to food, which shouldn’t be surprising since Mexican food is a prominent part of the culture, and it’s just so good!

EAT SOME “REAL” MEXICAN FOOD

Who doesn’t love going to a taco shop stateside and enjoying a burrito, a chimichanga and even some carne asada fries? But the truth is that the common Mexican food that is familiar to you can be considered “Americanized” by Mexicans. There is nothing wrong with that, it is still delicious, but in reality there is no such thing as a taco salad or a hard shell ground beef taco in the traditional Mexican cuisine, and cumin is not used as a main ingredient in beans and salsas. You are in Cabo for the beaches and the margaritas, but don’t forget that you are in MEXICO, so we incite you to take advantage of this and try some traditional Mexican food. Many restaurants in Los Cabos have typical Mexican dishes, or we also recommend that you venture into the backstreets of town and find a hole-in-the-wall spot for some real homestyle Mexican cooking. When it comes to traditional dishes, it can't get more patriotic than a chile en nogada, a Poblano chili stuffed with picadillo – a mixture of ground pork and/or beef, apples, pears, peaches and aromatics – bathed in a sweet, creamy walnut-based sauce and then topped with pomegranates and parsley. The green parsley and chilli, the white sauce and the red pomegranates represent the colors of Mexico’s flag.

CELEBRATE THE MEXICAN INDEPENDENCE DAY

Contrary to popular belief, May 5 (Cinco de Mayo) is not Mexico's Independence Day. The actual date of Mexico’s Independence is September 16. Independence Day is one of the most celebrated national holidays in Mexico and is commemorated with colorful parades, traditional food, lively music, marching bands, fireworks and fiestas decorated in red, white and green. Here in Los Cabos, you will find almost every bar, restaurant, and resort in town doing something festive to honor this special day including an explosive firework show on Medano Beach.

Every year on September 15, Mexico celebrates El Grito de Dolores (AKA Cry of Dolores). El Grito was the battle cry of Roman Catholic priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla in the early morning hours of September 15, 1810, in what is now the City of Dolores Hidalgo in the State of Guanajuato. Hidalgo’s cry to his townspeople to rise up against the Spanish became the cry of Independence for the whole country. Each year on this date, the President of Mexico re-enacts this famous cry from the balcony of the National Palace in Mexico City while ringing the same bell that Hidalgo rang in 1810 (which has since moved to the National Palace), shouting “Viva México! Viva la Independencia! Vivan los héroes!” Here in Los Cabos, City Officials re-enact their own version of the cry at 11pm on September 15 followed by fiestas late into the night.

This year it is uncertain how the new COVID-19 regulations will affetct the public festivities, we recommend that you consult with your concierge or with CATTAC, Los Cabos Tourist Assistance Center.

The main plazas of San José del Cabo and Cabo San Lucas are decorated in patriotic colors and ornaments during the month of September to commemorate the independence, so even if you can’t join the celebrations the day-of, you can visit the plazas to get the patriotic feel.

SIP A TEQUILA AND PAIR IT WITH A SANGRITA

Notice the word sip. The traditional Mexican way to drink tequila is to sip and savour it, not to shoot it. We understand if this sounds frightening, but if you order a good quality tequila it can actually be enjoyable. Ask your server for a sangrita (NOT the same as sangría), a delicious tomato juice based drink which is served in a shot glass as the perfect complement to a fine tequila. If you ask for a "bandera" (which means flag) you will get three shot glasses, each one representing the colors of the Mexican flag: one with tequila (white), one with sangrita (red) and one with lime juice (greeen).

EAT AN ESQUITE

An esquite, also known as elote en vaso (corn in a cup) is a Mexican snack sold in street carts or food stands along with the popular Mexcian corns. The word esquite comes from the Nahuatl word ízquitl, which means "toasted corn." Esquites are made from grains of corn that are first boiled in salted water and epazote, an herb used commonly in Mexican cooking, which releases a lot of flavor when boiled. It is served hot in small cups and topped with varying combinations of lime juice, chile powder or hot sauce, salt, and mayonnaise. The fun part about it is hunting down an esquite cart! You can usually find one along the Cabo San Lucas marina (near the Plaza Bonita ramp) and in the San José del Cabo main plaza.

DO A MEZCAL TASTING

Mezcal is an artisanal spirit which’s craftsmanship dates back to prehispanic times, making it as Mexican as it can get. Unlike tequila, every batch of mezcal is different, even if it comes from the same type of agave plant on the same farm. The natural elements the plant was exposed to come into play and affect the end result, producing slight changes in its flavor. There is a wide variety of types of mezcal, depending on the agave plant and the conditions it is grown in; from very earthy ones like the arroqueño, to smokier or smoother kinds. We recommend trying a flight of mezcal to experience these different flavors, several Mexican food restaurants in Los Cabos offer this. They say that mezcal is an acquired taste, so take your time to savour each one and appreciate the artful craft of mezcal.