February 25, 2019 8:47 pm

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FROM LORETO TO LAND’S END

Monthly Fishing Report
By Gary Graham

Baja Sur’s sportfishing is “a gift that keeps on giving” as 2019 settles in. The striped marlin continues to dazzle with double-digit catch and releases up at the Finger Bank, 50-miles north of Baja’s tip on the Pacific Side.

There are few places in the world that can deliver this kind of action this time of year for anglers willing to chase the “bite,” regardless of the location.

The acres of bait that gather on the Bank are also attracting other exciting exotics to the area. Dorado, along with yellowfin tuna feeding there, offer a larger target for big blue and black marlin weighing upwards of 500 pounds. Joining the crowd are the wahoo with their mouthful of razor-sharp teeth that can slice through the heaviest leaders in a heartbeat, adding another formidable degree of difficulty for anglers although their steaks are so tasty they are worth the effort.

The fishing closer to Cabo is also good — not the huge numbers of billfish that are taken up north, but there are striped marlin, dorado, yellowfin tuna and wahoo to be caught for those who are willing to put their time in.

There are some roosterfish and jack crevalle, along with sierra close enough inshore to see the hotels while fishing. Another option? The bottom fishing for yellowtail, grouper, pargo and other rockfish.

Up at Puerto Los Cabos, at the Gordo Banks, the North Winds are a factor now and will continue sporadically for several months. Yellowfin tuna, dorado and wahoo are all scarce.

Best chances are for a yellowfin tuna or two being landed are near the Iman Bank. Many boats have been lucky to catch one with most success using strips of squid and most of the tuna landed were up to 20 pounds. However, anglers have also been using a combination of caballito and some ballyhoo for bait with some success. Occasional dorado are still being seen along with a few wahoo.

The more productive action has been for a variety of structure species — the most common being the Eastern Pacific bonito, ranging up to 10 pounds, and they strike various lures as well as bait; there’s also red snapper (huachinango), glass eye snapper, baqueta, triggerfish, ocean whitefish, yellow snapper, flag cabrilla and trigger fish.

Farther up the coast at East Cape, wind surfers are taking advantage of the persistent north winds that are common this time of year. More mornings than not, windsurfers and anglers stand shoulder-to-shoulder at sun-up to decide which group will have the most fun on the water.

If it’s windy, the windsurfers prevail. No wind? The fishermen reign supreme, heading out until a wind line appears on the horizon. The catches can be remarkable.

There are still a few billfish farther offshore along with dorado, yellowfin tuna and maybe even wahoo.

Closer to shore, sierra, roosterfish and skipjack are the fish caught on the surface. Around the rocky points that dot the shoreline, fishing the bottom can produce cabrilla, grouper, snapper and other reef fish. All are great table fare.

Muertos Bay is producing some nicer-grade tuna, schoolie dorado, and even a few wahoo. The tuna were surprising up to 30 pounds. Dorado have been smallish with most hovering around 10 pounds, but nice size for the fisherman just looking for some action, especially first timers. Plus there are a good number of tough bonito to give them a tussle.

Inshore, the usual species of snapper, jack crevalle, sierra and an occasional big cabrilla round out the catch.

In Loreto, typical winter conditions have persisted with a few days lost to windy conditions. However, the sea temps are still warm ensuring that the dorado will remain around for a bit longer until the temps drop allowing anglers to score on live bait (sardina) along the coast in most areas when the winds back off.

Shallow-water yellowtail are also on the “hit or miss” menu for those people soaking live bait along the coast. No news from the yellowtail spots that are farther offshore; the upcoming north winds will be the determining factor for those destinations.

If the luck of the great winter fishing holds, there should be a super winter bottom- fishing season for yellowtail, pargo and baqueta to put on ice in the coming weeks.

Hopefully the summer of 2019 will have this past year’s 12-inch dorado returning as 40-pounders!

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No matter your destination in Los Cabos, within the pages of Destino Magazine you will find quality editorial about this beautiful region of Southern Baja, as well as relevant tourist information, maps, activities, culinary discoveries, entertainment, real estate, healthy living, local culture, art, sports, and more.

Contact Us

General Inquiries
contact@destinoloscabos.com

Advertising
advertising@destinoloscabos.com

Share Your Cabo
Experiences With Us
#DESTINOLOSCABOS
About Us

No matter your destination in Los Cabos, within the pages of Destino Magazine you will find quality editorial about this beautiful region of Southern Baja, as well as relevant tourist information, maps, activities, culinary discoveries, entertainment, real estate, healthy living, local culture, art, sports, and more.