January 21, 2019 8:52 pm

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By Gary Graham

While many parts of the United States and other countries are buffeted with extreme winter conditions, most of Baja Sur’s visitors who are arriving this month have fantasized about the bright Baja sun and are eager to bask in the Baja activities that are only available in the summer back home.

And they won’t be disappointed! Locals who are accustomed to the good fishing offered here year ‘round have been even more astonished by the quality and quantity of offshore, inshore and beach catches recently. Visiting first-time, casual and seasoned anglers all seem to agree.

Much to the delight of those who prefer to avoid rocking around in a boat, the recent results of fishing from shore on Baja beaches have been remarkable! All the way from the Pacific side up to Todos Santos, heads are shaking, and tongues are wagging as dorado, snapper and even an occasional quality-sized roosterfish or two are being taken from the beach.

On the Sea of Cortez side from San Jose to Los Barriles in East Cape, the beaches are offering similar results. As both fly and spinning rod-equipped anglers prowl the beaches with little or no surf to speak of, they are catching more of the same as the Pacific side plus sierra, pompano and ladyfish (that fight like a smallish tarpon).

Those fishing in boats close to shore are also enjoying more of the same plus dorado, small yellowfin tuna, sierra, jack crevalle and bonito on the surface.

When the surface action slows, the strategy changes and a variety of lures along with live or dead bait, are dropped down to the pinnacles — think underwater mountains — where an entirely different array of fish lurk, most of which are great table fare.

Even the wahoo have been a regular on the catch list; with their long, speedy runs, they are always a popular addition and great eating.

Crossing the line between inshore and offshore are the extraordinary monster yellowfin tuna being encountered at various banks — now think underwater plateaus — where various baitfish congregate, in turn attracting not only the huge tuna but also the even grander black and blue marlin that are much larger than the striped marlin found in the same areas.

On one of the plateaus, the “Finger Bank,” located over 50-miles north of “Lands End” on the Pacific side, the sardina gather and the stripers along with dorado and even more yellowfin tuna congregate to gorge on them; locals agree that this is one of the best striper shows in several years on this bank.

This is easily confirmed by the number of blue flags attached to many of the sport fisher’s outriggers in the Cabo San Lucas Harbor. Double-digit catch and releases are not uncommon and in some cases as many as 60+ billfish are released by experienced crews.

Up in the other direction to the north in the Sea of Cortez, the seasonal north winds are always a factor this time of year and they impact the fishing somewhat. No worries, however. Usually the winds back off after a few days, or they remain offshore in the morning allowing for a few hours of fishing before they reach shore.

Winter is on the mind of the East Cape anglers with the arrival of sierra and north winds — always a sure sign of a change in season. Still many fall species are in the neighborhood. The trick is picking the right day to fish. This is a conflicted community with about 50% fisherfolk and 50% wind surfers, which basically means half will always be satisfied with the weather.

Muertos Bay is a good example of where inshore fishing can be great for bonito, big jack crevalle, pargo, cabrilla and sierra when the wind backs off. During the last lull, the wahoo showed up catching some anglers off guard as the toothy wahoo sliced and diced, not only the baitfish but the monofilament lines of anglers who hadn’t changed over to wire leaders for the sierra.

It was more of the same at La Paz Bay as north winds dictated the days for anglers to either fish or explore the city.

Farther north at Loreto there were still cabrilla and some early-arriving yellowtail down deep, plus sierra signaling the transition from fall to winter. Yet the dorado and the bonito continued to bite and probably will until the sea temps fall.

Welcome to our sport fishing world, where fantasy merges with fact. Hope you take the time to enjoy the exciting opportunities and activities Baja’s bright sun has to offer.

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Contact Us

General Inquiries
contact@destinoloscabos.com

Advertising
advertising@destinoloscabos.com

Share Your Cabo
Experiences With Us
#DESTINOLOSCABOS
About Us

No matter your destination in Los Cabos, within the pages of Destino Magazine you will find quality editorial about this beautiful region of Southern Baja, as well as relevant tourist information, maps, activities, culinary discoveries, entertainment, real estate, healthy living, local culture, art, sports, and more.